The best way to record the labor cost to jobs without using time cards would be to do the following:


1. When you enter in the Payroll journal entry into Evosus, add the following entries to the bottom of the journal entry to credit the wages accounts that will be expensed to Jobs and debit a payroll clearing account; see the screen shot below for an example of the original journal entry. In the next blank line you would enter in the next two lines like this:


Description                                     DR             CR 

5040 – Wages Expense account                        $6655.69 

1170 – Payroll clearing                     $6655.69 


If you have several different types of wages to expense you can of course add several wage accounts as credits and then a single debit to payroll clearing.



2. Then add a vendor called Payroll vendor or whatever you choose to name it.

3. Then go to Write Checks and select this new vendor.

4. Enter in the date of this zero check and put any notes in the memo and ref field.

5. Select the “Switch to job “ link in the yellow accounts portion of the check.

6. Select the job, phase, labor cost code and amount for each job you need to expense the wages to.

7. Once you are done then select the “switch to GL” link and enter in the payroll clearing account.

8. The total amount recorded in the jobs section will populate as a negative in the amount field, save and either print the check now and give it a check name of pay(date) and print this zero check to screen. 

The posting to the check will credit the Payroll clearing account and debit jobs in progress for each of the jobs with wages expensed thus completing the posting process until the job is finalized.


Visual Representation:


Payroll Check to Employee




"In House" check used to allocate labor costs to the Job




General Journal Entry



Posting showing General Journal Entry, Payroll Check to Employee, and "In House" Check to Allocate Job Labor




Post of Revenue Recognition where Labor costs are recognized for the "In House" Check